Thursday, December 16, 2010

Gifts for Teacher

 So I'm new at this whole school thing - being  a parent of a nursery school child. I thought I'd get a nice card and maybe a bottle of wine for my daughters two teachers. Wow, was I way off. I'm a member of the Parent/Carers Teacher Association and just thought I'd ask if gifts were acceptable. Oh, yeah...they are.

I remember baking cookies for  my teacher and presenting them along with a small gift my mother picked out. The teacher was always delighted (or acted so) and I was pleased she/he was pleased. I only had one teacher a year during primary school so it was one gift.

The nursery that my daughter attends is a different story. There is the main teacher - who is lovely. And then there are two teachers who trade days throughout the week with my daughter's group. There are also three other teachers in the class who each have a group of children they look after. Then there is the nurse and the two lunchtime fill-ins who look after the kids. I'm expected to give a gift to EACH of them. It's madness. Apparently, a bottle of wine or a box of chocolates won't do - well it will but I'd be considered a cheapo - not that they would ever say that.

Here's what folks suggested: gifts cards to different women boutiques (mid-level not high end), jewellery, vouchers for music or electronics, electronics, etc. Some folks were more like me - it's too much. They are all really very nice women, but I am not a Rockefeller. That's eight gifts I'm expected to buy. AND I gave little cards to her 39 classmates. So what do I do - should I be the cheapo and buy wine or go whole hog and buy them each an iPad?  I want to do what's right but I don't want to break the bank at the same time.

I'd love some input on this one....

Lucy (see below in comments) sent two lovely ideas over that I have to share. How ADORABLE are these?

11 comments:

  1. Oh no that's ridiculous! It's a token, not an opportunity to fulfill their wishlist, which their families will be doing! I would be so embarrassed as a teacher to receive such expensive gifts!

    I think that something thoughtful and unique is much better. Toby is in Year 2 (he's six) and has one teacher, two teaching assistants, and three one-to-ones (job share, they look after him as he has Aspergers). This Christmas we bought six tea cups and saucers from a local charity shop (they were new and unused, really pretty and just £15!), planted them up with poinsettias, wrapped them in clear cellophane and tied them up with wired ribbons.

    I think that thought over money is much more appreciated. Another nice idea would be to decorate little terracotta pots and plant them up?

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  2. Wow, you're really inventive and creative! I love this idea...! Thanks Lucy.

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  3. Absolutely ridiculous to buy all those gifts you could just buy a beautiful box of chocolates or make biscuits and decorate the container and let them share that. Christmas isnt all about giving huge presents .... the world has gone crazy lol. Sorry but its got me started hehehehe xx

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  4. That is a bit extreme! They get a salary don't they? They don't need gifts, it's just nice to give something. I did a post today on my blog, we made chocolate fudge for Wee Z's teacher and then one other bag for the rest of the staff.

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  5. Yes they do get a salary, but they're human and like to know they are appreciated. My daughter has been a teacher for 8 years and loves the homemade treats the best. That someone took the time to make something for her means more than an expensive gift. I can' help but think that the advise you got from the parents was their own thinking. I find it hard to believe anyone involved with children would feel any different than my daughter

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  6. Whaaat giftcards, vouchers, jewelry? My boys 8 different nursery teachers get a box of chocs between them and they can like it or lump it lol.

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  7. Thanks for the input folks. I gave the three main teachers champagne, the rest received a box of chocolates each. And they seemed quite pleased.

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  8. Next year, you could organise a collection for the whole class and get them vouchers. :) If you can be bothered that is ;)) x

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  9. Good grief, times have certainly changed since I had children at school. I agree that a box of nice chocs and a nice hand-made card is a good idea. And as to all the cards for the children - I had never heard of that either. Guess I am well and truly beyond hope. Every Blessing PS - loved the meringue snowmen and the pics of Cate on the guest blog.

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  10. Cards for 39 children. Is this really necessary? and so many gifts - couldnt something done by yourself be considered
    more than enough. Isn't it supposed to be a token gift? Mug rug, hot chocolate mix in a mug, sort of thing.... times are a changing.

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  11. It is a political nightmare.... I reward where I see exceptional work. Christmas and Easter; I give a token gift but the summer (end of term) I do get the main teachers a good gift.

    I focus my children's attention on making their Christmas cards from October...(but then my children are older than yours.) I just leave all the making-stuff in a box and they make one every-so-often.... although I suggest you NEVER leave glitter in the box unless you want your house turned into fairy-land..

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Go ahead, make my day!